John Steinbeck – A Chronological Reading List

Steinbeck A Life in Letters book cover
Steinbeck A Life in Letters

This post is not a poetry prompt per-se, but it started out as something I was prompted to do so that I could improve my writing. The Monday Morning Memo suggested several books to read that would help someone become a better writer. I collected and read all of the books they suggested and, when I got to “Steinbeck A Life in Letters”, I realized that Steinbeck’s letters contained a lot about how he went about writing and the things that he was working on. I decided to read all of John Steinbeck’s published works in chronological order as I read his life in letters. I started keeping this list of his works and it kept growing as I found each new bibliography and online archive. I have read everything on the list now with the exception of a few that I haven’t been able to put my hands on yet (noted below where the word “Availability” is in bold). If you endeavor to read along with A Life in Letters or need a full list of John Steinbeck publications for any other reason, I hope the list below proves useful. The date of each item is the publication date, but I have done my best to put them in the order that he wrote them based on his letters and other references and bibliographies.

  1. 1924 – Fingers of Cloud: A Satire on College Protervity
    1. Steinbeck wrote this during his college years, and it was published in February 1924 in The Stanford Spectator
    2. A story that was inspired by Steinbeck’s experiences as a straw boss on a sugar-beet ranch in Chualar, California, in 1920
    3. Availability: The first page can be read online here I have not yet found a full copy to read in print or online
  2. 1924 – Adventures in Arcademy: A Journey into the Ridiculous
    1. Steinbeck wrote this during his college years, and it was published in June 1924 in The Stanford Spectator
    2. An early satire of university life
    3. Availability: I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online
  3. 1975 – Steinbeck A Life in Letters
    1. Released as a hardcover book in 1975 by Elaine Steinbeck and Robert Wallsten
    2. An edited collection of letters written by John Steinbeck from 1926 to 1968 addressed to his friends and associates
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  4. 1936 – St. Katy the Virgin
    1. Thought to be written between 1925-26. It was sent to McIntosh and Otis in May 1932 and first published as a limited edition of 199 copies by Covici-Friede in 1936
    2. A satirical tale of a hell-raising pig converted to Christianity by a monk
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  5. 1927 – The Gifts of Iban
    1. Published in March 1927 Smoker’s Companion Magazine under the name John Stern, then in 1986 Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck
    2. A story of an Elf that only has his imagination to give
    3. Availability: Used copies of the Japanese printing of Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck can be found online with a price range of USD $17.00 – $170.00
  6. 1929 – Cup of Gold
    1. Steinbeck finished this in January of 1928, and it was published as a novel in August 1929
      1. There was also an early unpublished version called A Lady in InfraRed
    2. A fictional story about the real pirate Henry Morgan
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  7. 1933 – To a God Unknown
    1. Steinbeck finished this in Spring of 1930, revised it in 1932, and it was published in September of 1933
    2. A story of a man coming to CA from the East to homestead in California with a deep connection to his land and family
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  8. 1932 – The Pastures of Heaven
    1. Steinbeck finished this in 1931 and originally published in October of 1932 by a publisher that went bankrupt and then published again in September of 1933
    2. A series of short stories of families living in a California valley all tied together by the Munroe family
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  9. 1941 – How Edith McGillicuddy Met R.L.S.
    1. Steinbeck wrote this in 1933 while he was writing the other short stories that became The Long Valley based on a personal account he heard from Max Wagner’s mother, Edith Gilfillan Wagner. When he learned Edith had submitted her own version to Reader’s Digest, he withdrew his version. In 1940 he re-submitted it and gave the royalties to Edith. It was originally published in the August 1941 issue of Harper’s Magazine, then the 1946 edition of Portable Steinbeck, then in 1986 Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck
    2. A story based on an incident that actually happened to Max Wagner’s mother, Edith Gilfillan Wagner when she wondered away from a funeral and met Robert Louis Stevenson
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  10. 1933 – The Red Pony
    1. Steinbeck started this in 1933, the stories appeared as individual pieces in 1933–1936, then in 1937 as a limited edition (first three stories), and then as part of The Long Valley
    2. A story of a young boy, Jody, receiving and caring for a pony
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  11. 1935 – Tortilla Flat
    1. Steinbeck started this in the Summer of 1933, finished in Spring of 1934 and it was published in May of 1935
    2. Fictional tales of the paisanos, residents of a shantytown in the hills above Monterey known as Tortilla Flat
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  12. 1933 – The Gift
    1. Written in June 1933 and first published in North American Review November 1933
    2. Part 1 of The Red Pony
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  13. 1933 – The Great Mountains
    1. Written in July 1933 and first published in North American Review December 1933
    2. Part 2 of The Red Pony
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  14. 1934 – The Murder
    1. Written in Late Summer/Early Fall of 1933 and first published in April 1934 issue of The North American Review
    2. The tale of a love triangle and its tragic consequences
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  15. 1937 – The Chrysanthemums
    1. Written in Fall 1933 through February 1934 and first published in Harper’s Magazine October 1937
    2.  The story of Elisa Allen, who lives with her husband Henry on a well-tended ranch
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  16. 1937 – The Promise
    1. Written in Winter 1934 and first published in Harper’s Magazine May 1937
    2. Part 3 of The Red Pony
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  17. 1934 – The Raid
    1. Written in May–June 1934 and first published in the North American Review in October 1934
    2. The story of Dick, an experienced Communist Party member and strike organizer, and Root, his young apprentice
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  18. 1938 – The Harness
    1. Written in May–June 1934 and first published in the Atlantic Monthly June 1938
    2. A story of a man that is a pillar of the community and how is wife got and kept him there
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  19. 1938 – Flight
    1. Written in May–June 1934 and first published in The Long Valley in 1938
    2. The story of a young man who commits murder and must flee
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  20. 1935 – The White Quail
    1. Written in May-June 1934 and first published in the North American Review in March 1935
    2. A story of Mary the Gardener and her husband, Harry
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  21. 1937 – Johnny Bear
    1. Written in late June 1934 and first published in Esquire September 1937 as “The Ears of Johnny Bear”
    2. A story focused on a nameless narrator, an outsider who divides his time between his job in the swamp and the Buffalo Bar in Loma, and Johnny Bear, a grossly described bear-like idiot savant who can mimic with precision any voice he hears.
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  22. 1936 – The Vigilante
    1. Written in July–August 1934, there is an early unpublished version of this called “Case History” and first published as “The Lonesome Vigilante” in Esquire Magazine October 1936
    2. The story surrounding a vigilante group that took action
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  23. 1934 – The Snake
    1. Written in July–August 1934 and first published in Monterey Beacon June 22, 1935, then published in February 1938 edition of Esquire under the title “A Snake of One’s Own”
    2. A story of a woman that visits a laboratory to satisfy her curiosity with snakes
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  24. 1936 – Breakfast
    1. Written July–August 1934 and first published in Pacific Weekly November 9, 1936
    2. A scene where the narrator travels through the Long Valley at daybreak and finds breakfast
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  25. 1936 – The Leader of the People
    1. Written in Winter 1934 and first published in Argosy 20 August 1936
    2. Part 4 of The Red Pony
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  26. 1938 – The Long Valley
    1. A collection of previously published short stories published as a novel, The Long Valley, in September of 1938 ordered this way in the book:
      1. The Chrysanthemums
      2. The White Quail
      3. Flight
      4. The Snake
      5. Breakfast
      6. The Raid
      7. The Harness
      8. The Vigilante
      9. Johnny Bear
      10. The Murder
      11. St. Katy the Virgin
      12. Red Pony
      13. The Gift
      14. The Great Mountains
      15. The Promise
      16. The Leader of the people
    2. Availability: Free to read online here
  27. 1936 – In Dubious Battle
    1. Started in 1934 and published in January 1936
    2. A story about labor strife in California agriculture
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  28. 1936 – Dubious Battle In California
    1. Originally published in The Nation Vol. 143, No. 11 September 12, 1936, and then published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A nonfiction article on the history of California’s migrant problem
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  29. 1936 – A Depiction of Mexico by an Author with no Pattern to Vindicate
    1. Published in the San Francisco Chronicle May 31, 1936
    2. Steinbeck’s book review of Mexican Interlude by Joseph Henry Jackson
    3. Availability: I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online
  30. 1936 – The Way it Seems to John Steinbeck
    1. Published in The Occident Vol. 29 Fall 1936
    2. Steinbeck responds to the editor’s request that he write an article of advice to students, declining to do so for reasons set out in his letter
    3. Availability: I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online
  31. 1937 – Of Mice and Men
    1. Started in 1936 (first draft eaten by his dog, Toby) and published in 1937
    2. A play-novelette about two men trying unsuccessfully to hold down jobs and stay out of trouble
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  32. 1947 – The First Watch
    1. Only 60 copies of The First Watch were produced in 1947 by Marguerite and Henry Louis Cohn of the House of Books in New York for presentation to friends
    2. A letter dated January 5, 1938, from Steinbeck to Arnold Gingrich, who had given him his first watch as a gift
    3. Availability: Copies of this can be found online with a price range of USD $5,000.00 – $8,000.00. I have not yet found a copy to borrow in print or online.
  33. 1938 – The Play-Novelette
    1. Originally published as “The Novel Might Benefit …” in Stage 1938, then as The Play-Novelette in the forward to Burning Bright, then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An essay about his experimental form of a pieces that be read as a novel but also performed as a play without need of condensing or rewriting
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  34. 1978 – Letters to Elizabeth
    1. Published in 1978 by the Book Club of California: San Francisco
    2. Starts with a letter written in March 1938 about Of Mice and Men the play
    3. Availability: Used copies can still be found online and usually go for around USD $60.00
  35. 1936 – The Harvest Gypsies: On the Road to the Grapes of Wrath
    1. Originally printed in October 1936 San Francisco News, and reprinted in expanded version as a pamphlet titled Their Blood is Strong in 1938, also published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A series of 7 nonfiction articles about migrant workers in California
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  36. 1938 – Starvation Under The Orange Trees
    1. Originally printed in Monterey Trader April 1938, also published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A nonfiction article written about his travels with Tom Collins to investigate the condition of migrant workers after flooding in Visalia
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  37. 1939 – The Grapes of Wrath
    1. Written from May 31 through October 26, 1938, and published in April of 1939
    2. A story of a family that has to leave their farm in Oklahoma and goes to California in search of work. Through this story, Steinbeck weaves all he saw, learned, and felt while he witnessed the plight of the migrant workers in California.
    3. Availability: Read online for free here
  38. 1989 – Working Days: The Journals of The Grapes of Wrath
    1. Written alongside Grapes of Wrath as a journal and published in 1989
    2. A journal John used to warm up for each day’s writing while working on Grapes of Wrath
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  39. 1938 – Writers Take Sides
    1. Originally published in League of American Writers: N.Y. 1938, an excerpt appears in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A response to a question sent to several writers in 1938, “Are you for or are you against the legal government and the people of Republican Spain?”
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  40. 1938 – Tom Collins
    1. Originally written as a forward to a never published book by Tom Collins (Brining in the Sheaves by pen name Windsor Drake) and published by itself in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A description of Tom Collins by John Steinbeck
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  41. 1967 – Woody Guthrie
    1. Originally published as the forward to Hard Hitting Songs For Hard-Hit People in 1967 and also published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. The piece introduces Woody’s work and songs
      1. Woody recorded his Dust Bowl Ballads in 1940 including “The Ballad of Tom Joad”
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  42. 1941 – Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research
    1. Started in 1940 and published in December of 1941
    2. A nonfiction book about marine specimens and observations gathered on a trip to the Sea Of Cortez from March through April of 1940
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  43. 1951 – The Log from the Sea of Cortez
    1. Published in 1950
    2. A version of Sea of Cortez with only Steinbeck’s narrative from the original book and an essay titled About Ed Ricketts
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  44. 1941 – The Forgotten Village
    1. Written in 1940 and published in 1941
    2. Written as a script for a documentary about the difficulty of introducing modern medical practice in a rural village in Mexico, it was then published as a book with still images from the movie
    3. Availability: The book can be read for free here and the movie can be viewed via some streaming services
  45. 1940 – Our Country
    1. Published and syndicated by the NEA as part of a series of 24 articles by famous authors in September of 1940
    2. Steinbeck predicts that Americans will set aside their differences and come together to defeat Hitler and totalitarianism in the coming war
    3. Availability: Digital scans available with paid subscription to www.newspapers.com
  46. 1942 – The Moon Is Down
    1. Steinbeck started this in 1941 and it was published in March of 1942
    2. A fictional play-novelette about a small-town rebellion in an occupied country
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  47. 1942 – Bombs Away: The Story of a Bomber Team
    1. Written and published in 1942
    2. At an oval office meeting in September 1941, FDR asked Steinbeck to travel with photographer John Swope and write a nonfiction picture book about the training of bomber crews. The hope was that it would attract more air force enlistments.
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  48. 1943 – Letter to Mother
    1. John Steinbeck’s story adapted by Orson Welles and read on the January 18, 1943, Ceiling Unlimited radio program
    2. A story about an aviator writes home to his mother and younger brother. The letter says that all is well, but mother knows what really happened.
    3. Availability: Radio program can be heard for free here and the script can be read for free here
  49. 1943 – With Your Wings
    1. This was read on the January 25, 1943, Orson Wells Ceiling Unlimited radio program, it was then published in the November 2017 Strand Magazine
    2. A short story about an African American in the air force
    3. Availability: Radio program can be heard for free here and the script can be read for free here, back issues of Strand Magazine can be purchased on their site or other sites that sell used publications
  50. 1958 – Once There Was A War
    1. Originally a series of articles written for the Herald Tribune from June 21 to December 19, 1943, then published as a book in September 1958
    2. A mix of nonfiction reporting and elaborated stories about WWII
    3. These published articles did not appear in Once There Was a War (titled by the first line of text):
      1. The Boston Globe June 28, 1943 – England – “This is the crew of the Mary Ruth”
      2. The Boston Globe June 30, 1943 – England – “It is almost 11 O’clock”
      3. The Boston Globe July 5, 1943 – England – “They got together simply because”
      4. The Boston Globe July 11, 1943 – England – “His Spitfire crashed and burned”
      5. The Boston Globe July 17, 1943 – England – “Sergeant Henry M. crane came back”
      6. The Boston Globe July 30, 1943 – England – “The city was very dark”
      7. The Boston Globe August 3, 1943 – England – “To the G.I.’s in the field”
      8. The Boston Globe August 6, 1943 – England – “It would be impossible”
      9. The Boston Globe August 10, 1943 – England – “This letter was received from a man”
      10. The Boston Globe August 28, 1943 – Africa – “The interior of the huge plane”
      11. The Boston Globe August 31, 1943 – Africa – “The greatest complaint one hears”
      12. Oakland Tribune September 6, 1943 – Africa – “When the technical sergeant came through”
      13. The Boston Globe September 10, 1943 – England – “I have seen the soldiers come down”
      14. The Boston Globe September 17, 1943 – Written by Ernie Pyle – “John Steinbeck is a recent addition” (Ernie Pyle’s description of meeting Steinbeck in Africa that’s worth reading alongside Steinbeck’s articles)
      15. The Boston Globe September 17, 1943 – Italy – “This island famed in song and story”
      16. Oakland Tribune October 13, 1943 – Italy – “If the Italians had not surrendered”
      17. The Boston Globe October 29, 1943 – Home Front – “It has occurred to this writer”
      18. The Boston Globe November 8, 1943 – Home Front – “Barbara has done almost everything”
      19. The Boston Globe November 17, 1943 – Italy – “The triple lines of torpedo boats” (part of Plywood Navy)
      20. The Boston Globe November 22, 1943 – Italy – “This story isn’t very funny”
      21. The Boston Globe November 26, 1943 – Home Front – “This is a kind of letter to the Navy”
      22. The Boston Globe December 19, 1943 – Home Front – “The German soldier stood disconsolate” (Bumblefoot)
    4. Availability: The book is available to read online for free here and scans of the articles are available through a paid subscription to www.newspapers.com
  51. 1966 – Ernie Pyle
    1. Published as one of Newsday’s “Letters to Alicia” on May 21, 1966, and then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
      1. Steinbeck met Ernie Pyle during WWII and Ernie passed away in 1945. Although Steinbeck’s tribute wasn’t published until 1966, I recommend reading it after Steinbeck’s WWII correspondence
    2. A tribute to his friend and fellow war correspondent that he met in Algiers in 1943
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  52. 1945 – Cannery Row
    1. Steinbeck started this in November of 1943, and it was published in 1945
    2. A story about the characters that lived on Monterey’s Cannery Row
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  53. 1946 – This is the Monterey We Love
    1. Published in the Monterey Peninsula Herald Vol. 57, No. 157 July 3, 1946
    2. Article about Monterey California
    3. Availability: I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online
  54. 1947 – The Time the Wolves Ate The Vice-Principal
    1. Originally published in March 1947 issue of ’47 The Magazine of the Year, then Steinbeck Newsletter Fall 1995, then in 1986 Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck
    2. Susan Shillinglaw noted the short story’s origin as Chapter 6 of Steinbeck’s original manuscript of Cannery Row
    3. Availability: Used copies of the Japanese printing of Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck can be found online with a price range of USD $17.00 – $170.00. Used copies of the March ’47 The Magazine of the Year can be found online with a price range of USD $7.00 – $20.00
  55. 1947 – The Pearl
    1. Written and filmed in 1945 and originally published as a book in November of 1947
    2. A story of a Mexican villager that finds an enormous pearl and is faced with what to do with such wealth
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  56. 1947 – The Wayward Bus
    1. Written in 1946 and originally published as a book in February of 1947
    2. The story of a group that gathers at an outpost station to take a bus ride that end up far off the main route
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  57. 1948 – A Russian Journal
    1. Written 1947 and originally published as a book in April of 1948
    2. A non-fiction book about his trip with Robert Cappa to the Soviet Union
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  58. 1948 – Women and Children In the U.S.S.R.
    1. Originally published in Ladies Home Journal Vol. 65, No. 2 February 1948
    2. An article about Steinbeck’s 1947 trip to the Soviet Union that focuses on the women they witnessed and encountered including photographs by Robert Cappa
      1. The text and images in this issue are different than what appear in the book A Russian Journal
    3. Availability: Used copies of Ladies Home Journal February 1948 can be found online and usually sell for USD $10.00 – $20.00
  59. 1948 – About Ed Rickets
    1. Written after Ed Rickets death on May 11, 1948, and first published in September of 1950 in The Log from the Sea of Cortez, then published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A tribute to his friend, Ed Rickets
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  60. 1975 – Viva Zapata!
    1. Written as a screenplay in 1948-49 and released as a movie in 1952, then published as a book in 1975
    2. The story of Mexican revolutionary, Emiliano Zapata
    3. Availability: Screenplay is free to read online here
  61. 1948 – The Miracle of Tepayac
    1. Originally published in Collier’s Magazine December 25, 1948, then in Argosy (London) Vol. 10, No. 4 April 1949 as The Miracle, then in 1986 Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck
    2. A retelling of the Mexican folklore about a miracle that occurred on a hilltop near Tepayac Mexico
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  62. 1949 – His Father
    1. Written in April of 1949 on the way home from a trip to see his sons in New York and originally published in September 1949 Readers Digest, then in 1986 Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck
    2. A story that deals with a young child’s secret concerning his father’s absence
    3. Availability: Used copies of the Japanese printing of Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck can be found online with a price range of USD $17.00 – $170.00
  63. 1950 – Burning Bright
    1. Written in 1949 and originally published in October of 1950 (the play came out at the same time)
    2. A play-novelette that takes place in three different settings but continues the story of a couple struggling to have a child
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  64. 1950 – Critics, Critics, Burning Bright
    1. Originally published in the November 11, 1950, The Saturday Review, then in Steinbeck and His Critics by E.W. Tedlock Jr.
    2. Steinbeck’s response to the critics of the play Burning Bright
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  65. 1950 – My Ideal Woman
    1. Originally published in Flair Vol. 1, No. 6 July 1950
    2. Steinbeck and several other “male notables” comment briefly on the “ideal woman,” in each case accompanied by a drawing sketch of that woman
    3. Availability: Used copies of Flair magazine can be found online with a price range of USD $20.00 – $30.00
  66. 1951 – Some Random and Randy Thoughts on Books
    1. Originally appeared in The Author Looks at Format 1951, then an abbreviated version in Vogue November 5, 1951, as The Naked Book, and then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. Steinbeck criticizes publishers’ methods for selling books
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  67. 1969 – Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters
    1. Written in 1951 and originally published in 1969
    2. Steinbeck started each day of writing East of Eden by writing a letter to Pascal Covici on the opposite page of his notebook. These were later published as the Journal of a Novel
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  68. 1952 – East of Eden
    1. Steinbeck started this in February and completed it in November of 1951, it was originally published in September of 1952
    2. A book that blends the history of Steinbeck’s family in California with the story of two brothers from the East
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  69. 1954 – The Circus
    1. Originally published in 1954 Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus Magazine and then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. The story of when the circus came to town when Steinbeck was young (thought to be part of the stories he assembled while writing East of Eden)
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  70. 1955 – The Summer Before
    1. Originally published in the May 25, 1955, British Punch Magazine, then in 1986 Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck
    2. The story of a childhood summer spent with his sister and neighborhood friends (thought to be part of the stories he assembled while writing East of Eden)
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  71. 1953 – A Model T Named “It”
    1. Originally published in Ford Times Vol. 45, No. 7 July 1953, then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. The story of Steinbeck driving his mother home in his Model T (thought to be part of the stories he assembled while writing East of Eden)
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  72. 1952 – Duel Without Pistols (Steinbeck vs. The Reds)
    1. Originally published in the August 23, 1952, Collier’s Magazine, then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An account of a communist newspaper, L’Unita, writing an attack about Steinbeck when he arrived in Rome and his reply
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  73. 1953 – Positano
    1. Originally published in Harper’s Bazaar Vol. 87, No. 5 May 1953, then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An account of his visit to Positano Italy
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  74. 1952 – The Soul and Guts of France
    1. Originally published in the August 30, 1952, Collier’s Magazine
    2. An account of Steinbeck’s visit to the French countryside
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  75. 1953 – I Go Back To Ireland
    1. Originally published in Collier’s January 31, 1953, then in Argosy May 1956 as Green Paradise, also in in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A non-fiction article about he and Elaine’s visit to Ireland to search for John’s maternal ancestral home
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  76. 1953 – The Secret Weapon We Were Afraid to Use
    1. The idea was conceived and presented to President FDR in September 1940, later written as a short story and originally published in the January 10, 1953, Collier’s Magazine
    2. The story of what would have happened if counterfeit money was dropped near a town in Russia
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  77. 1952 – O. Henry’s Full House
    1. This movie was filmed and originally released in 1952
    2. John Steinbeck wrote introductions and appeared on camera to narrate the film depicting some of O. Henry’s stories
    3. Availability: Can be viewed for free online here
  78. 1952 – Adlai Stevenson
    1. Written as a forward to Speeches by Adlai E. Stevenson and originally published in 1952, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An introduction to Adlai Stevenson as a speech writer and candidate
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  79. 1953 – Autobiography: The Making of a New Yorker
    1. Originally published in The New York Times Magazine Section 6, Part 2 Feb. 1, 1953, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. Steinbeck’s account of failing in New York, visiting New York, and finally settling in New York
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  80. 1953 – The King Snake and the Rattlers: A Parable for Americans
    1. Published in The Currier Journal March 1, 1953, and St. Louis Post Dispatch March 15, 1953, and Brief Vol. 1, No. 4 April 1953
    2. An essay about how Americans are living in fear of communism and losing a great deal because of it, including our liberties and words
    3. Availability: Can be read online with a paid subscription to www.newspapers.com
  81. 1953 – My Short Novels
    1. Originally published in Wings Oct. 1953, then reprinted in The English Journal 43 1954, then in Steinbeck and His Critics by E.W. Tedlock Jr.
    2. This preface to a collection of six short novels gives Steinbeck an opportunity to comment on his reasons for writing each. The novels include The Red Pony, Tortilla Flat, Of Mice and Men, The Moon Is Down, Cannery Row, and The Pearl.
    3. Availability: Used copies of Steinbeck and His Critics can be found online with a price range of USD $10.00 – $15.00
  82. 1954 – Sweet Thursday
    1. Steinbeck started this in 1953 and it was originally published in June of 1954, also adapted to the musical play Pipe Dream
    2. A sequel to Cannery Row (and a happier ending for Doc than in real life)
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  83. 1954 – In Awe of Words
    1. Originally published in the March 3, 1954, issue of The Exonian, then in The Paris Review Vol. 12, No. 48 Fall 1969 as part of article The Art of Fiction XLV: John Steinbeck
    2. Steinbeck’s account of writing and being a writer
    3. Availability: Can be read online here
  84. 1954 – Jalopies I Cursed and Loved
    1. Originally published in July 1954 Holiday magazine
    2. A lighthearted article where Steinbeck reflects on cars he has owned and the impressions they have made
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  85. 1954 – Robert Capa
    1. Originally published as “Robert Capa: An Appreciation” in Photography Vol. 35 September 1954, also included in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A tribute to his recently deceased friend, Robert Capa
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  86. 1954 – One American in Paris 1-17
    1. While living in Paris during the Summer of 1954, Steinbeck wrote 17 articles that were published in Le Figaro magazine. Only some of the original English versions were republished later. The order reflects publication date and the #number reflects Steinbeck’s ordering of the pieces. Many were also published in London’s Punch magazine which can be found here: https://archive.org/details/pub_punch
    2. #1 – John Steinbeck Begins a Dialogue with Paris and the Parisians
      1. Published in Le Figaro June 12, 1954
      2. Steinbeck announces he intends to write a series of articles presenting Paris to the Parisians as seen through one American’s eyes
      3. Availability: No English version found for this piece. I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online.
    1. #2 – “Second Piece”
      1. Published in the same issue as #1 without a new headline in Le Figaro June 12, 1954, then published in English as “Death with a Camera” in the Picture Post (London) Vol. 63 June 12, 1954
      2. Steinbeck describes receiving the news about the death of this friend, photographer Robert Capa
      3. Availability: I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online
    2. #3 – Reply to the French demanding, ‘What Do You Think about McCarthyism?’
      1. Published in Le Figaro June 19, 1954
      2. Steinbeck took the longer view that democracies occasionally need demagogic challenges like these to keep on their toes
      3. Availability: No English version found for this piece. I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online.
    1. #4 – I Love that Island of the City
      1. Published in Le Figaro June 26, 1954, then as Miracle Island of Paris in Holiday Vol. 19, No. 2 February 1956, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
      2. An article about taking his sons to visit the island in the Seine on which Paris was founded
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    1. #5 – Paris As I See It
      1. Published in Le Figaro July 3, 1954, then as Reality and Illusion in Punch Vol. 227, November 17, 1954, then as What is the Real Paris? in Holiday magazine December 1955
      2. Steinbeck rhapsodizes over the scenes that endear the city to him
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    1. #6 – “Carnival of the Stars”
      1. Published in same issue as #5 with no separate headline Le Figaro July 3, 1954
      2. An enthusiastic account of the hearty reception he received at an open-air book signing
      3. Availability: No English version found for this piece. I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online.
    1. #7 – On the Banks of the Oise
      1. Published in Le Figaro July 10, 1954, then as Fishing in Paris in Punch Vol. 227 August 25, 1954, then as Of Fish and Fisherman in the October 4, 1954, issue of Sports Illustrated, also as On Fishing in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
      2. Article about taking his sons fishing on the River Oise
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    1. #9 – A True Story that Doesn’t Seem Possible
      1. Published in Le Figaro July 17, 1954, then in John O’London’s Weekly Vol. 63 September 19, 1954, then as The Joan in All of Us in Saturday Review Vol. 39 January 14, 1956, also as The Joan in All of Us in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
      2. An account of the remarkable accomplishments of Joan of Arc
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    2. #8 – Of Stars and Men
      1. Published in Le Figaro July 24, 1954, then as Trust Your Luck in Saturday Review Vol. 40 January 12, 1957
      2. A meditation on the dangers of stereotyped thinking having a deleterious influence on expanding children’s thought
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    1. #10 – The Amiable Fleas
      1. Published in Le Figaro July 31, 1954, then in Strand Magazine Issue 58 2019
      2. A satirical story about how a restaurateur won his coveted second Michelin star
      3. Availability: Back issues of Strand Magazine can be purchased on their site or other sites that sell used publications
    2. #12 – Enough Said about ‘Good Old Days’
      1. Published in Le Figaro August 7, 1954
      2. Steinbeck’s response to reporter Maria Crapeau’s question during a public interview about why American novelists have recently been dwelling so much on the past
      3. Availability: No English version found for this piece. I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online.
    1. #11 – In Quest of an Olympus
      1. Published in Le Figaro August 14, 1954, then as Capitol Roundup: Paris in The Saturday Review April 16, 1955
      2. An article about finding a restaurant where he could install a waxwork figure that would give diners the impression that they were watching a famous writer at work
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    2. #13 – The French, Dear to My Heart
      1. Published in Le Figaro August 21, 1954, then as Discovering the People of Paris in Holiday magazine August 1956, then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction as One American in Paris thirteenth piece
      2. Announcing his forthcoming departure from Paris, Steinbeck speaks of the many Parisians he has come to admire
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    1. #14 – L’Affaire Du 1 Avenue De M
      1. Published in Le Figaro August 28, 1954, then as The Affair at 7 Rue de M April 1955 Harper’s Bazaar, then 1965 Magazine of Horror #12
      2. A satirical tale of his son chewing bubble gum
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    2. #15 – English Sauce
      1. Published in Le Figaro 1954
      2. Jokes about the French’s low opinion of English cooking
      3. Availability: No English versions found (might have similar content to Vegetable Wars article). I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online.
    1. #16 – An Unknown Person: The American Tourist
      1. Published in Le Figaro September 11, 1954, then as A Plea for Tourists in Punch Vol. 228 January 26, 1955, then as The Yank in Europe in Holiday January 1956, then an excerpt as Vive Les Americains in The Currier Journal January 8, 1956
      2. Steinbeck pleads that the French not stereotype American visitors
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
    1. #17 – The True Revolution
      1. Published in Le Figaro September 18, 1954, also as I Am a Revolutionary in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
      2. Steinbeck answers charges that he is not revolutionary enough
      3. Availability: Free to read online here
  87. 1954 – How to Tell Good Guys from Bad Guys
    1. Originally published in Punch September 22, 1954, then in The Reporter March 10, 1955
    2. A telling of a conversation with his son about Westerns on television and their stereotyped depictions of good guys and bad guys
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  88. 1955 – Report On America
    1. Published in Punch June 22, 1955
    2. A satirical article about some current and not so current events in the Unites States of America
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  89. 1955 – Bricklaying Piece
    1. Published in Punch July 27, 1955
    2. An article about Steinbeck’s experience gardening in New York and building a protective brick wall for his plants
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  90. 1955 – How to Recognize a Candidate
    1. Published in Punch August 10, 1955
    2. An article to the British people about how candidates running for public office in the United States of America behave
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  91. 1955 – The Death of a Racket
    1. Originally published in The Saturday Review April 2, 1955
    2. A commentary on people lying in the McCarthy hearings for fame
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  92. 1955 – Cooks of Wrath
    1. Originally published in Everybody’s (London) April 9, 1955, then in The Saturday Review July 21, 1956, as The Vegetable War
    2. A humorous look at how the English cook vegetables
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  93. 1955 – A Plea To Teachers
    1. Originally published in Saturday Review Vol. 38 April 30, 1955
    2. An open letter to teachers begging them to stop encouraging their students to write to the author when they have book reports to do
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  94. 1955 – Some Thoughts on Juvenile Delinquency
    1. Originally published in Saturday Review Vol. 38 May 28, 1955
    2. A look at juvenile delinquency and a plea for more parental responsibility
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  95. 1955 – Always Something to Do in Salinas
    1. Originally published in Holiday Vol. 17 June 1955, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A look back at the town where he was born
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  96. 1955 – Critics – From a Writer’s Viewpoint
    1. Originally published in the August 27, 1955, The Saturday Review, then in Steinbeck and His Critics by E.W. Tedlock Jr., also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An article about the erratic and often hostile nature of literary criticism
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  97. 1955 – Random Thoughts on Random Dogs
    1. Originally published in Saturday Review Vol. 38, October 8, 1955, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An essay on how the role of dogs in society has changed over the years
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  98. 1955 – Writer’s Mail
    1. Originally published in Punch Vol. 229, November 2, 1955, then as The Mail I’ve Seen in Saturday Review Vol. 39 August 4, 1956
    2. An article about the categories of mail that Steinbeck receives
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  99. 1955 – . . . . Like Captured Fireflies
    1. Originally published in CTA [California Teachers Association] Journal Vol. 51 November 1955, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. “School is not easy and it is not for the most part very much fun, but then, if you are very lucky, you may find a teacher.” America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction-page 142
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  100. 1955 – We’re Holding Our Own
    1. Originally published in Lilliput Vol. 37 November 1955, then in April 1958 issue of Playboy and in Adam August 1966 as The Short-Short Story of Mankind
    2. A comical take on man’s instinct for survival
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  101. 1955 – Dreams Piped From Cannery Row
    1. Published in The New York Times November 27, 1955
    2. Steinbeck writes about his experiences on Cannery Row and the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical based on Steinbeck’s work
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to www.nytimes.com
  102. 1955 – More About Aristocracy: Why Not a World Peerage?
    1. Originally published in Saturday Review Vol. 38 December 10, 1955
    2. Steinbeck proposes that men will rise to greatness if they have a motive to do so
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  103. 1956 – How Mr. Hogan Robbed a Bank
    1. Written in 1956 and published in Atlantic Monthly March 1956
    2. The story of a small-town bank robber later becomes the source for his last novel, The Winter of Our Discontent
    3. Availability: Used issues of the Atlantic Monthly can be purchased online with a price range of USD $10.00 – $15.00
  104. 1956 – A Protest About Ancestors
    1. Published in Men Only and London Opinion Vol. 61, No. 243 March 1956
    2. An article on ancestors
    3. Availability: I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online
  105. 1956 – Madison Avenue and the Election
    1. Originally published in Saturday Review Vol. 39 March 31, 1956
    2. Steinbeck’s reaction to the announcement that the Republican and Democratic parties were using New York advertising agencies to design their presidential campaigns for 1956
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  106. 1956 – John Steinbeck at His First Kentucky Derby
    1. Published in Newsday May 7, 1956
    2. Steinbeck’s account of attending his first Kentucky Derby in 1956
    3. Availability: Can be read online with a paid subscription to www.newspapers.com
  107. 1956 – Graduates: These are Your Lives
    1. Written as a letter to James S. Pope on May 16, 1956, then published in Esquire Vol. 84 September 1975, and in Steinbeck A Life in Letters 1975
    2. Availability: Free to read online here
  108. 1956 – National Conventions
    1. Steinbeck attended both political national conventions and published articles in The Currier Journal from August 12 to August 25, 1956
    2. This is a list of the articles and Currier Journal publication dates
      1. August 12, 1956 – Steinbeck Covers The Conventions
      2. August 14, 1956 – Gripes of Wrath
      3. August 15, 1956 – Democrats Get ‘Voice’
      4. August 16, 1956 – Jam Session
      5. August 17, 1956 – This Is Our Way
      6. August 18, 1956 – Eavesdropper’s Report
      7. August 19, 1956 – And So to Bed
      8. August 20, 1956 – Memories of Chicago
      9. August 21, 1956 – G.O.P. Delegates Have Bigger, Better Badges (But No Hot Dogs!)
        1. Also published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
      10. August 22, 1956 – Oh, for A Truman!
      11. August 23, 1956 – All Together, Now
      12. August 24, 1956 – Accord Complete at Frisco; Lambs, Lions Fight To Sit Together
      13. August 25, 1956 – Candidate for The Sack
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to: www.newspapers.com
  109. 1957 – My War With the Ospreys
    1. Originally published in Holiday Vol. 21 March 1957, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. Steinbeck’s story about his attempt to accommodate a pair of Ospreys at Sag Harbor
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  110. 1957 – A Game Of Hospitality
    1. Originally published in Saturday Review No. 16 April 20, 1957, then in St Louis Post Dispatch April 28, 1957, then in The Daily Standard December 2, 1957
    2. An article about, and list of, the great thinkers and writers throughout history that would not be allowed into the United States because of current laws
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to: www.newspapers.com
  111. 1957 – The Short Reign of Pippin IV: A Fabrication
    1. Written in 1956 and published in April of 1957
    2. A satirical story of French politics and how they bring back the Monarchy
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  112. 1957 – Letters on Criticism: “A Letter on Criticism”, “Rationale”, “On Steinbeck and His Critics”
    1. Published in Steinbeck and His Critics by E.W. Tedlock and C.V. Wicker
    2. Letters Steinbeck wrote about criticism and his critics
    3. Availability: Used copies of Steinbeck and His Critics can be found online with a price range of USD $10.00 – $15.00
  113. 1957 – Louisville Courier-Journal travel pieces
    1. Steinbeck writes twenty-three travel pieces for Louisville Courier-Journal between April 17 and July 17, 1957
    2. Courier Journal pieces listed below with other found publications
      1. April 17, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 1 – Steinbeck at sea – Writer Eats Five Meals Every Day, Invents Golf Machine Between Bites
      2. April 21, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 2 – Steinbeck at sea – Welcome Parties Use Up 1st Half of a Voyage, Good-by Parties Rest
      3. April 24, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 3 – See Naples and Die – Steinbeck Taps A Shaky Source, Hears Luciano Heads Racket Club
      4. April 28, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 4 – Steinbeck in Italy – Globe-Trotting Author Is Awed At Proof of Da Vinci’s Genius
      5. May 5, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 5 – Steinbeck in Italy – Florence’s ‘Explosion of the Chariot’ at Easter Is Steeped In Legend
        1. Also published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
      6. May 9, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 6 – I’d Rather Be Wrong… – Anyway, Errors Keep The Readers Happy
      7. May 12, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 7 – Steinbeck in Italy – Note to Rome: Don’t BE A Goose – Honor The One That Saved The City
      8. May 15, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 8 – Steinbeck in Italy – Guy Named Joe Sees Rome With A Pair Of Keen Eyes
        1. Also published as “A Brooklyn Boy Grows in Rome” in Newsday May 16, 1957
      9. May 19, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 9 – Steinbeck in Italy – Excavations at St. Peters Yield Link Between Traditions and Truth
        1. Also published as “Under St. Peter’s: Traditions, Truth” in Newsday May 21, 1957
      10. May 22, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 10 – Steinbeck in Italy – Bask In Reflected Glory? That Way Lies Popularity
      11. May 26, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 11 – Steinbeck in Italy – Mrs. S. Sees The Pope: ‘So Nice, So Very Nice’
      12. May 29, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 12 – Steinbeck in Italy – Something Ain’t Good? Blame It on The Comet
      13. June 2, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 13 – Steinbeck in Italy – Anybody Know What To Do With A Literary-Historical Treasure?
      14. June 5, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 14 – Steinbeck in Italy – Solvent and Bored? Italy’s Spas Hold Out Alluring Message of Hope
      15. June 9, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 15 – Steinbeck in Italy – Mighty Steinbeckian Brain Cracks (Cracks The Etruscan Code, That Is)
      16. June 12, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 16 – Steinbeck in Italy – ‘Robin’ at The Vast Vatican Library Pecks for A Worm of Information
      17. June 16, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 17 – Steinbeck in France – Nothing Like Selecting Miss France To Cure Sophisticated Stomach-Ache
      18. June 19, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 18 – Steinbeck in England – Tenacious British Reporters Pose Ticklish Questions for A Visitor
      19. June 23, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 19 – Steinbeck in England – Maybe Cat DID Look at The Queen, But Mr. S. Saw Tykes and A Plume
        1. Also published as “Bleacher View of a Royal Birthday” in Newsday June 20, 1957
      20. June 27, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 20 – Steinbeck in England – Homesickness May Not Be Fatal, But It Seems To Be Unavoidable
      21. June 30, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 21 – Steinbeck in London – Case of The Hotel Ghost – Or…
        1. Also published in Evening Standard [London] January 25 1958
        2. Also published in 1986 Uncollected Stories of John Steinbeck as “Reunion at the Quiet Hotel”
        3. An account of John and Elaine’s stay at a hotel when they were in London (during Elaine’s first trip to Europe)
      22. July 14, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 22 – Steinbeck in Sweden – When Swedes Welcome Summer, It Turns Out To Be Quite A Party
      23. July 17, 1957 – Steinbeck in Europe 23 – Steinbeck in Sweden – Red Novelist’s Visit Produces Uneasy Talk
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to: www.newspapers.com
  114. 1957 – A Clear and Present Danger: The Trial of Arthur Miller
    1. Originally published in Esquire Vol. 47 June 1957, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An article that defends Arthur Miller, who is on trial for contempt of Congress charges stemming from the investigations conducted by the House Un-American Activities Committee
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  115. 1957 – Open Season on Guests: A Harassed Host Declares Total War on Party Girls and Boys
    1. Originally published in Playboy Vol. 4 September 1957
    2. A satirical article about how to get back at unruly party guests 
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  116. 1957 – “D” for Dangerous
    1. Originally published in McCall’s Vol. 85 October 1957
    2. An article about special license plate tags for dangerous drivers
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  117. 1957 – Dichos: The Way of Wisdom
    1. Originally published in The Saturday Review November 9, 1957
    2. An article about the phrases used by Mexican couples during formal courtship (Dichos were also used by the lead character in Viva Zapata)
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  118. 1958 – Dedication
    1. Published in Journal of the American Medical Association July 12, 1958, then a condensed version appears in Readers Digest October 1958
    2. A tribute to the determination of the Spivack family to have the son become a doctor
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  119. 1958 – The Easiest Way to Die
    1. Originally published in The Saturday Review August 23, 1958
    2. An article about how getting life insurance is the best way to guarantee an early death
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  120. 1958 – The Golden Handcuff
    1. Originally published in San Francisco Examiner November 23, 1958, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An article about Steinbeck’s recollections of San Francisco (For more on Steinbeck’s San Francisco experience, it’s worth reading “John Steinbeck” in Name Dropping by Barnaby Conrad)
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  121. 1966 – Henry Fonda
    1. Originally published in Harper’s Bazaar November 1966, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. This article about Henry Fonda aligns with a letter he wrote to Fonda in November of 1958 and so appears here in the timeline (Henry Fonda played Tom Joad in Grapes of Wrath film)
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  122. 1959 – Writer Catches Lions by Tale
    1. Published in the Monterey Peninsula Herald Oct. 3, 1959
    2. Steinbeck’s tale of setting out to get a head of a puma (mountain lion) to mount in the British warship HMS Puma
    3. Availability: I have not yet found a copy to read in print or online
  123. 1976 – The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights
    1. Written in a tiny cottage on the outskirts of the Somerset town of Bruton, in England, from March through September 1959, Published posthumously in 1976
    2. A modern translation of Malory’s King Arthur tales
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  124. 1959 – Two Kinds of Christmases
    1. Originally a letter written to Adlai Stevenson on November 5, 1959, then published as Steinbeck’s part of “Adlai Stevenson and John Steinbeck Discuss the Past and the Present,” in Long Island Newsday December 22, 1959, then as “Our “Rigged” Morality” in Coronet Vol. 47 March 1960, then in Good Housekeeping Vol. 165 December 1967, then in Steinbeck a Life in Letters, then a revised version as “Dear Adlai” in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. A lament of how the gluttony of America will be its downfall
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  125. 1959 – Reply to Stevenson Letter Backlash
    1. Published in Newsday March 1, 1959
    2. Steinbeck’s reply to all of the people that wrote to Newsday about his letter to Adlai Stevenson
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to: www.newspapers.com
  126. 1961 – Conversation at Sag Harbor
    1. Originally published in Holiday Vol. 29 March 1961, Then in Newsday March 30 1961, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An article about a visit with his sons in March of 1960
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  127. 1960 – A Primer on the 30’s
    1. Originally published in Esquire Magazine June 1960, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. Steinbeck’s reflection on the 1930’s
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  128. 1960 – Atque Vale
    1. Originally published in The Saturday Review July 23 1960, then as The Black Man’s Ironic Burden in The Negro History Bulletin Vol. XXIV April 1961, also in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. An article about the irony of people that expect black men to be perfect while thinking they are inferior
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  129. 1961 – The Winter of Our Discontent
    1. Written March-July 1960 and published in 1961
    2. A story that expands on the short story of How Mr. Hogan Robbed a Bank
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  130. 1962 – Travels with Charley: In Search of America
    1. Written in the Summer of 1961 about a trip taken in Fall of 1960 and published as a book in 1962, excerpts were published in the Detroit Free Press from September 7 to September 15, 1962
    2. An account of Steinbeck’s trip around the country in a camper with his dog
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  131. 1962 – L’Envoi
    1. Published in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. The original final chapter of Travels with Charlie that was not included in the book about Steinbeck’s invitation and attendance to the president’s inauguration
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  132. 1961 – High Drama of Bold Thrust Through Ocean Floor
    1. Article written in March of 1961 and originally published in Life Vol. 50 April 14, 1961
    2. A log of the voyage of CASS 1 to take core samples of the earth’s crust deep beneath the Pacific Ocean
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  133. 1962 – On Learning Writing
    1. Published as a preface to the 1962 Viking Compass edition of Story Writing by Edith Ronald Mirrielees (Steinbeck’s writing teacher at Stanford), then printed as On Learning Writing in Writer’s Yearbook No. 34 1963
    2. Availability: Used copies of Writer’s Yearbook can be found online with a price range of USD $40.00 – $50.00
  134. 1962 – John Steinbeck’s Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962
    1. First published in Vogue Vol. 141 March 1, 1963, then in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. The speech given by Steinbeck in 1962
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  135. 1963 – Reflections on a Lunar Eclipse
    1. Published in New York Sunday Herald Tribune October 6, 1963, then in The San Francisco Examiner October 6, 1963
    2. An article about how “The Moon is Down” came to be written and what happened to it subsequently
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to: www.newspapers.com
  136. 1966 – America and Americans
    1. Book written in 1965 and published in 1966, then excerpts printed in Newsday November 12-19, 1966
    2. A series of essays written to accompany photographs of America and Americans
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  137. 1965 – Then My Arm Glassed Up
    1. Published in Sports Illustrated Vol. 23 December 20, 1965, and in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. In August of 1965 Ray Cave, asked Steinbeck to write an essay on sport. Steinbeck’s response declining to do so is printed here
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  138. 1965-66 – Newsday Letters to Alicia #1-28
    1. Published from November 20, 1965, through May 28, 1966
    2. Original series of articles titled Letters to Alicia published in Newsday prior to Steinbeck’s correspondence from Vietnam. Below is a listing of the original Letters to Alicia articles with their dates and an excerpt from the first line of text.
      1. Nov. 20, 1965, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “There is no question that the times are changing …”
      2. Nov. 27, 1965, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “There is bound to be a fine big dustup over Eric Sevareid’s …”
      3. Dec. 4, 1965, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “Two weeks ago, New York Post columnist Max Lerner wrote a column …”
      4. Dec. 11, 1965, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “It will be no news to you that I will soon be leaving the country …”
      5. Dec. 18, 1965, London, ENG. “I was airborne on my way to London when I opened the New York Times…”
      6. Dec. 24, 1965, London, ENG. “As I suggested in a recent letter, the cabinet post for Nonsense is such an enormous responsibility …”
      7. Dec. 31, 1965, Alnwick, ENG. “I write this in haste and excitement, because in the library of Alnwick Castle …”
      8. Jan. 8, 1966, Abbotsford, Scotland “My letter about finding the Arthur manuscript at Alnwick …”
      9. Jan. 15, 1966, County Kerry, Ireland “It’s a lovely thing to be traveling and stopping down the 181 Contributions to Periodicals West Coast of Ireland …”
      10. Jan. 22, 1966, Galway, Ireland “Of course, I knew that sometime I would have to face the Santa Claus scandal …”
      11. Jan. 29, 1966, Galway, Ireland “Now with the intensity of Christmas past …”
      12. Feb. 5, 1966, Galway, Ireland “I’ve edged off from writing you about the ghost of Anthony Daly …”
        1. Also published as “The Ghost of Anthony Daly” in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
        2. An account of the ghost that haunts John Huston’s house in Galway Ireland where Steinbeck stayed for Christmas in 1964 when he heard about the story and again in 1965 when he wrote the letter
      13. Feb. 12, 1966, London, England “We are roosting in London, en route from Ireland to Israel…”
      14. Feb. 19, 1966, London, England “Mark Twain limited what we talk about …”
      15. Feb. 26, 1966, Tel Aviv, Israel “We have now been two and a half days in Israel …”
      16. March 5, 1966, Tel Aviv, Israel “You know, I’m glad I’m finishing this trip with a visit to Israel…”
      17. March 12, 1966, Haifa, Israel “If ever there were two Protestant, gentile Americans better fitted …”
      18. March 19, 1966, Tiberias, Israel “You must have had it happen hundreds of times in your travels…”
      19. March 26, 1966, Haifa, Israel “I write this more in anger than in sorrow…”
      20. April 2, 1966, Tel Aviv, Israel “Back here after 40 years in the desert between here and the Red Sea …”
      21. April 9, 1966, Haifa, Israel “I should think this might be the last letter about Israel itself, …”
      22. April 16, 1966, Haifa, Israel “My last letter to you was a kind of bug’s view of history…”
      23. April 23, 1966, Haifa, Israel “Yadin pointed to the square Roman camp far below …”
      24. April 30, 1966, Sag harbor, N.Y. “Remember when I made a tour across the United States and back …”
      25. May 7, 1966, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “You have always been interested in paradox …”
      26. May 14, 1966, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “You can’t say the world isn’t on the move…”
      27. May 21, 1966, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “In a way I loved to leave America last December…”
      28. May 28, 1966, Sag Harbor, N.Y. “Haven’t you awakened from deep sleep remembering …”
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to: www.newspapers.com
  139. 1966 – Open Letter to Poet Yevtushenko
    1. Published in Newsday July 11, 1966, and in America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction
    2. Written in response to “Soviet Poet Bids Steinbeck Speak” published on July 8, 1966, in The New York Times
    3. Availability: Free to read online here Yevtushenko’s New York Times article can be read online with paid subscription to: www.nytimes.com
  140. 1966 – Let’s Go After the Neglected Treasures Beneath the Seas: A Plea for Equal Effort on “Inner Space” Exploration
    1. Published in Popular Science Vol. 189 September 1966
    2. Steinbeck’s letter describing how the United States should be investing at least in much in sea exploration as they are in space exploration
    3. Availability: Used issues of Popular Science magazine can be found online with a price range of USD $5.00 – $10.00
  141. 1966 – Steinbeck in Vietnam
    1. Steinbeck wrote articles during his 1966 trip to view the Vietnam conflict. These were published in Newsday as part of the Letters to Alicia series. In 2012, Thomas E. Barden published “Steinbeck in Vietnam” containing these articles and several that were not previously published.
    2. Letters in this book that were not published as part of the Newsday Letters to Alicia series:
      1. Published in Philadelphia Bulletin on December 25, 1966 “The bugs are in again in Vietnam …”
      2. Not previously published, written on December 9, 1966 “We stopped here to be briefed …”
      3. Not previously published, labeled “letter no. 8”, “Just back from a field trip …”
      4. Not previously published, labeled “letter no. 9”, written on January 4, 1967 “If I had any ambition …”
      5. Not previously published, labeled “letter no. 34” “Very often you read in the papers …”
      6. Published in Newsday on February 4, 1967, “The Paper War” an article that showed graphics of the leaflets themselves but not the text by Steinbeck
      7. Not previously published, labeled “letter no. 25” “As you are well aware, wars …”
      8. Not previously published, “Although I am numbering this …”
      9. Not previously published, labeled “letter no. 38”, “Before I started this journey …”
    3. Availability: Free to read online here
  142. 1966 – Newsday Letters to Alicia #29-77
    1. Steinbeck wrote articles during his 1966 trip to view the Vietnam conflict. These were published in Newsday as part of the Letters to Alicia series from December 3, 1966, through May 20, 1967
    2. Below is a list of the Vietnam Letters to Alicia series with their dates and an excerpt from the first line of text:
      1. December 3, 1966, the series introduction, no place stated, “To me, very exciting news …”
      2. December 10, 1966, no place stated, “You must have seen a crowd of bloodthirsty but cowardly people …”
      3. December 17, 1966, no place stated, “Every year about this time we have China season at the United Nations…”
      4. December 24, 1966, Saigon, “I must say I’m glad to be getting out of town …”
      5. December 31, 1966, Saigon, “The Christmas truce is over …”
      6. December 31, 1966, Saigon, “Remember how the lordly jet cuts its engines at 35,000 feet …”
      7. January 5, 1967, Saigon, “Strange happenings are becoming commonplace here in South Vietnam…”
      8. January 7, 1967, Pleiku, “Where do we get our impressions of places we have never seen?…”
      9. (A side note describes the cover for this issue bearing a photograph of Steinbeck being instructed on how to fire an M79 grenade launcher.)
      10. January 7, 1967, mountains northwest of Pleiku, “I would like more than anything to be able to plug in …”
      11. January 7, 1967, Pundit Manor, Saigon, “Do you remember my telling you that any mistakes might be beauties …”
      12. January 12, 1967, no place stated, “Here in Vietnam, people give me presents …”
      13. Accompanied by a poem “Hail to John Steinbeck’s Visit to Vietnam” by Nguyen Quang-Hien
      14. January 13, 1967 “Want to hear some pure James Bond …”
      15. January 14, 1967, Saigon, “This war in Vietnam is very confusing …”
      16. January 14, 1967, Saigon, “I want to speak of our troops …”
      17. January 19, 1967, no place stated, “I have to tell you about the massive nature of this strange Vietnam action …”
      18. January 21, 1967, Can Tho, “By chopper to Delta region of Vietnam …”
      19. January 21, 1967, Can Tho, “I wrote to you about the quiet patrol on the river …”
      20. Accompanied by a photograph of Steinbeck aboard a Navy patrol boat
      21. January 28, 1967, Pussi Mountain, near Pleiko, “I came up here to visit the Pussi Mountain Garden Club …”
      22. January 28, 1967, Pussi Mountain Culture and Rest Center, “In my last, I told you about the triumphant arrival …”
      23. February 2, 1967, Saigon, “Soon after I arrived in South Vietnam, I became aware …”
      24. February 3, 1967, no place stated, “As I told you yesterday in my last letter …”
      25. February 4, 1967, Saigon, “Ev Martin, who is bureau chief here for Newsweek …”
      26. February 4, 1967, Saigon, “Very often since I have been ‘in country’ …”
      27. accompanied by a photograph of Steinbeck carrying a rifle
      28. February 9, 1967, no place stated, “I’ve tried to tell you about as much of Vietnam as I have seen …”
      29. February 11, 1967, Saigon, “Don Besom of the Joint U.S. Public Affairs Office …”
      30. February 11, 1967, no place stated, “I wrote you about the teeming almost secure town of Tan An…”
      31. February 11, 1967, no place stated, “It is easy to remember how every war develops its wry and bitter personal humor…”
      32. February 14, 1967, Saigon, “I guess everyone who has been here has reported that the present city of Saigon is a mess …”
      33. February 18, 1967, Saigon, “You know how it is when large and maybe earth-shaking things are happening …”
      34. February 18, 1967, no place stated, “Students all over the world …”
      35. February 20, 1967, Saigon, “One of the most interesting …”
      36. February 23, 1967, Bangkok, “This letter is not one of speculation…”
      37. February 25, 1967, Saigon, “It is time for us to continue our journey on to Thailand…”
      38. March 4, 1967, Bangkok, “I must tell you that it is a delayed-fuse emotional shock …”
      39. March 4, 1967, Bangkok, “This flitting about may make me appear …”
      40. March 11, 1967, Northeast Thailand, “I wonder whether I made it clear …”
      41. March 11, 1967, Northeast Thailand, “In my last I started to tell you about Northeast Thailand …”
      42. March 14, 1967, Bangkok, “You remember how, when you are going away for the summer, …”
      43. March 18, 1967, Bangkok, “I’ve probably tried to tell you more about the wild northeastern provinces …”
      44. March 18, 1967, Bangkok, “The year is running and it is time for us to move on…”
      45. March 20, 1967, Bangkok, “I’m not going to give you a geography lesson …”
      46. March 25, 1967, Vientiane, Laos, “A traveler is reported to have said …”
      47. April 1, 1967, Vientiane, “As you may know, the subject of visas …”
      48. April 8, 1967, Vientiane, “I guess I learn slowly …”
      49. April 15, 1967, Jakarta, Indonesia, “Before the whole world sinks helplessly …”
      50. April 22, 1967, Bali, “This is a place of dream…”
      51. April 29, 1967, Jakarta, “I recently was present at the last scene …”
      52. May 6, 1967, Jakarta, “I guess you can call this letter Bung II …”
      53. May 13, 1967, Tokyo, “I remember promising you that I would be …”
      54. May 20, 1967, Tokyo, “Our time is nearly up now…”
    3. Availability: Can be read online with paid subscription to: www.newspapers.com
  143. 1967 – Camping is for the Birds
    1. Published in Popular Science Vol. 190 May 5, 1967
    2. Steinbeck writes his opinion of camping and its downfalls which was published as a debate with Earle Stanley Gardner and the issue contains Earle’s rebuttal next to Steinbeck’s article (this appears to be the last thing published during Steinbeck’s lifetime)
    3. Availability: Used issues of Popular Science magazine can be found online with a price range of USD $5.00 – $10.00

Published by Vos - Poetry and Prose

IT Professional by day – Creative Muse by night

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